Good Jobs First Subsidy News

07/03/2018

By Greg LeRoy and Maryann Feldman

Fostering local hi-tech success doesn’t have to mean offering huge subsidies to companies like Apple and Amazon. Here are some alternative strategies

Every mayor and governor wants to attract hi-tech jobs. And why not? Depending on the nature of the facility, such jobs can be well-paid and strengthen a region’s economy.

04/04/2018

By Ese Olumhense, The Chicago Tribune

Amazon’s search for a location for its second headquarters has been unusually public, but the secrecy surrounding the incentives state and local governments are offering to lure the Seattle-based e-commerce giant could set a troubling precedent for taxpayers, a group that tracks corporate subsidies said in a Tuesday report.

02/26/2018

By Greg LeRoy, Good Jobs First

The Caddo Parish debate over a costly tax-break program deserves the attention of every Louisiana taxpayer.

Why? Because local elected officials in Louisiana recently regained a very important power they were stripped of 80 years ago. Unlike any other state in the nation, parish councils, school districts, sheriffs and cities were denied the right to control decisions about whether to grant property tax abatements to corporations.

01/09/2018

BY David Dayen, New Republic

As Amazon builds up its distribution network, it’s hit on a trick long practiced by the likes of Walmart: using the federal government to help pay its workers. A new study by Policy Matters Ohio found that more than 700 Amazon employees receive food stamps, or more than 10 percent of the tech giant’s 6,000-strong workforce in the state. Some of those recipients may be part-time help, but the fact that they need federal aid to survive suggests that they would be happy to work more. “Why is this giant, successful company offering such limited pay and hours of work that many of its workers need help buying food?” asked Zach Schiller, research director at Policy Matters.

12/16/2017

By Rebekah Allen, The Advocate

Story Highlights

- Exxon Mobil, has gradually lost some 1,900 jobs in East Baton Rouge Parish, while receiving tax cuts worth almost $700 million over 20 years.

- The industrial tax exemption program has for years had no job requirement, and many companies have self reported job losses as they were allowed to forego millions of dollars in tax payments to local governments